“Disconnected”: Video Blog about the Palestinian village of Susya ~ by Rabbis for Human Rights

Published on Dec 18, 2012

Disconnected: Video blog from Palestinian village of Susya | Video 1

In this video-post you will get to know the children of the Nawaja and Shuneran families, the two largest families in Susya. You can observe the difficulty of growing up in a deprived village under constant threat of demolition. The population of Susya is impoverished, existing on the margins of Palestinian society. The simple wish of Susya’s residents is to be able to continue to make a living by practicing their traditional lifestyle of grazing and agricultural work. If we take away their ability to sustain themselves, who will take moral and practical responsibility for their welfare?

“Not Connected” is a video-blog project that brings the story of 10 years old Hadidja and her family who live in Susya, a Palestinian village in the South Hebron Hills, which is threatened with destruction.

It is not connected to electricity or water and, of course, is not connected to the internet. Susya residents live in caves and tin-shacks. A third world village that is located approximately 40 minutes ride from Jerusalem.

“This publication has been produced with the assistance of the European Union. The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of “Shomrei-Mishpat: Rabbis for Human Rights” and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the European Union.



Published on Dec 23, 2012

Disconnected: Video blog from Palestinian village of Susya | Video 2

This video will introduce Susya’s elementary school, which was established four years ago and has been under the constant threat of demolition. The pending demolition orders issued by the Israeli Civil Administration (The branch of the Israeli army that deals with civilian affairs.) put at risk the basic right to education for dozens of young students, and threaten to destroy years of hard work carried out by devoted teachers. The school offers the first stage of education for children between the ages of 6-11 (Sometimes children attend even when they are older, as they cannot afford to continue their education elsewhere). The school is run by the principal, Muhammad Abu Jaber, and four teachers. The faculty members and the principal are also responsible for the maintenance of the school. Because educational alternatives are very distant and require families to pay for transportation, the existence of this school is critical to the lives of the younger generation of Susya.


“Not Connected” is a video-blog project that brings the story of 10 years old Hadidja and her family who live in Susya, a Palestinian village in the South Hebron Hills, which is threatened with destruction.

It is not connected to electricity or water and, of course, is not connected to the internet. Susya residents live in caves and tin-shacks. A third world village that is located approximately 40 minutes ride from Jerusalem.





Published on Jan 29, 2013

Disconnected Video blog from Palestinian village of Susya | Video 3

In this post we accompany the children of the Shuneran family on their daily chore of shepherding and sheep grazing. One must remember that the area where Susya is located is an arid area, which makes it difficult for the farmers to maintain their livestock. Given that the people in Susya are not connected to the water infrastructure, they and their livestock are dependent on water from cisterns. However, the cisterns are often being deliberately polluted and/or permanently damaged, apparently by settlers from nearby settlements. Due to the scant precipitation in the area, the water accumulated in the cisterns does not last for the entire year. Therefore, the people in Susya have to buy their water from Israeli settlements, such as Kiryat Arba.

In the video Fariha relates that the settlers used to hassle the local residents even when she was a little girl, but the harassments have worsened in the past few years. Alhough the children in Susya behave with much more maturity than one would expect from children their age because they need to take care of their family’s livestock, work in the field, and maintain the household, they are still kids with dreams, hobbies, hopes, and aspirations. The settlers’ violence and the political situation in the area prevents Susya’s children from following their dreams and fulfilling themselves, because they bear such responsibility for the welfare of their families.

“Disconnected” is a video-blog project that brings the story of 10 years old Hadidja and her family who live in Susya, a Palestinian village in the South Hebron Hills, which is threatened with destruction.

It is not connected to electricity or water and, of course, is not connected to the internet. Susya residents live in caves and tin-shacks. A third world village that is located approximately 40 minutes ride from Jerusalem






Published on Mar 10, 2013

Not Connected to the Education Infrastructure | Video 5

In this episode of Disconnected we follow ten-year-old Hamudy on his way to a regional school in the village of A-Twany. A-Twany is bigger than Susya and can provide better education, but is a twenty-minute drive by bus and cannot meet the needs of all of Susya’s children.

We then return to the harsh reality in Susya’s local school and its sorry condition. But even under these circumstances we will learn an optimistic lesson in democracy and the ability to choose against the dictatorship that seeks to impose its rules.





“Disconnected” is a video-blog project that brings the story of 10 years old Hadidja and her family who live in Susya, a Palestinian village in the South Hebron Hills, which is threatened with destruction.

It is not connected to electricity or water and, of course, is not connected to the internet. Susya residents live in caves and tin-shacks. A third world village that is located approximately 40 minutes ride from Jerusalem

Website  Susya village
https://susyablog.wordpress.com/

Website Rabbis for Human Rights
http://rhr.org.il/eng/index.php/about/

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